Government, Latest News, WVPA Sharing

Legislative Lookahead: Co-tenancy for natural gas drilling to be one of top energy issues of W.Va. Legislative session

By Andrea Lannom

The Register-Herald of Beckley

Delegate Bill Anderson, R-Wood, and Senator Glenn Jeffries, D-Putnam, discuss possible legislation on natural gas production during the West Virginia Press Association’s Legislative Lookahead Friday, Jan. 5, in Charleston. West Virginia Press Association Photo

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Legislators anticipate co-tenancy to be one of the top energy issues to come up in this year’s West Virginia legislative session.

Delegate Bill Anderson, R-Wood, said his vision is to enact such legislation, which he believes will simplify the process when there are multiple owners in a single tract of land.

Anderson and others spoke to the media Friday at the 2018 West Virginia Press Association’s Legislative Lookahead.

“Right now, it is very difficult to find the missing owners who may have had interest in minerals passed down over generations,” Anderson said.

Charlie Burd, executive director of the Independent Oil and Gas Association, explained co-tenancy deals with a single tract of land whereas lease integration combines several tracts of land with many

different owners. He said there are times when 15 to 20, sometimes hundreds of people can have ownership of a particular tract of land.

“If you have just one that would refuse to develop that tract of land, you wouldn’t be able to go after that tract of land,” Burd said.

Charlie Burd, executive director of the Independent Oil and Natural Gas Association of W.Va., discusses possible legislation on natural gas production during the West Virginia Press Association’s Legislative Lookahead Friday, Jan. 5, in Charleston. Panelists Angie Rosser, executive director of the W.Va. Rivers Coalition, and Anne Blankenship, executive director of the W.Va. Oil and Natural Gas Association, listen to Burd’s comments. West Virginia Press Association Photo

Last year, a bill dealing with co-tenancy died in the Legislature. Under this bill, 75 percent of landowners had to agree to development. Sen. Glenn Jeffries, D-Putnam, said he anticipated this year’s bill to follow that same threshold.

Jeffries said he wants to make sure minority owners are addressed in the legislation as well.

“We want to make sure they are going to receive what the majority does with rights as well and get their due process to take their concerns to the circuit judge to get that fair market value,” he said.

Greg Kozera, marketing director of Shale Crescent USA; Steve Hedrick, president and CEO of Mid-Atlantic Technology, Research and Innovation Center; Senator Glenn Jeffries, D-Putnam; and Delegate Bill Anderson, R-Wood, take questions on possible legislation that could impact natural gas production during the West Virginia Press Association’s Legislative Lookahead Friday, Jan. 5, in Charleston. West Virginia Press Association Photo

In an interview later Friday, House Speaker Tim Armstead said there are a few concerns about co-tenancy in the House. One is having a sufficient percentage of owners to agree to develop. …

Read the entire article at http://www.register-herald.com/news/co-tenancy-to-be-one-of-top-energy-issues-of/article_e65ba091-26f1-52dd-91af-7f824fb75f4d.html

Read more articles at http://www.register-herald.com

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to Our Newsletter