By April 15, 2016 Read More →

Alzheimer’s Association to host community workshops on dementia conversations, warning signs

Events set for Parkersburg and Morgantown

CHARLESTON, W.Va. —  The Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter, is offering a free community workshops in Morgantown and Parkersburg in April.

In Morgantown, the Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter is offering a free community workshop, Dementia Conversations. The one-hour workshop will be held in Morgantown on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 at 4:30 p.m. at the Alzheimer’s Association Morgantown office, located at 1299 Pineview Drive, Ste. 3.

The workshop offers helpful topics to assist families with difficult conversations related to dementia, including going to the doctor, deciding when to stop driving, and making legal and financial plans. The workshop is open to the public and community members are encouraged to attend.

 In Parkersburg, the Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter is hosting a Know the 10 Signs: What’s Normal, What’s Not workshop in Parkersburg on April 19, 2016 at 3 p.m. at Emmanuel Baptist Church, located at 1710 23rd Street. The workshop will provide attendees with information about the difference between normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease, the benefits of early detection, as well as tips to follow up on any concerns attendees may have about themselves or someone they care about.

 

“Over five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease, and as many as sixteen million will have the disease by 2050,” said Bethany Hall, Executive Director of the Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter.  “Knowing the warning signs of Alzheimer’s and getting diagnosed early is vital to receiving the best help and care possible.”

 

People who attend the Know the 10 Signs workshop will discuss the fears and myths associated with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias as well as the following key topics:

  • The 10 warning signs
  • Basic overview of Alzheimer’s disease
  • Risk factors
  • What is involved in getting a diagnosis
  • Benefits of early detection including accessing available treatment, planning for the future and participating in clinical trials

 

For more information about Alzheimer’s disease, or to connect to information and support through the free 24/7 Helpline, contact the Alzheimer’s Association at 800.272.3900.  A complete listing of all community workshops can be found at www.alz.org/wv.

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The Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter

The Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter is the leading voluntary health organization in Alzheimer care, support and research in West Virginia. Our mission is to eliminate Alzheimer’s disease through the advancement of research; to provide and enhance care and support for all affected; and to reduce the risk of dementia through the promotion of brain health. Our vision is a world without Alzheimer’s. For more information, visit www.alz.org/wv or call 800.272.3900.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Alzheimer’s Association, West Virginia Chapter | wvinfo@alz.org | 800.272.3900

April 13, 2016

 Morgan Young | Marketing & Communications Coordinator

Alzheimer’s Association, WV Chapter | 1601 2nd Ave., Charleston, WV 25387 
Office: 304.343.2717 | Fax: 304.343.2723 | Helpline: 800.272.3900

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