By May 18, 2017 Read More →

Construction employers celebrate Infrastructure Week

Staff report

The State Journal

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The Construction Employers of America joined with the co-chairs of the Congressional Building Trades Caucus May 17 to mark Infrastructure Week 2017.

Road construction is one of the most expensive infrastructure projects government can undertake.
(File photo)

The annual celebration is part of a nationwide effort to advocate for investment in all forms of domestic infrastructure and raise awareness of the importance of construction and infrastructure.

“As an engineer, I understand how America’s construction workers helped build this great country,” said U.S. Rep. David B. McKinley, R-W.Va., co-chair of the Congressional Building Trades Caucus. “From infrastructure investments to corporate tax reform to streamlining regulations, there are a host of options for federal policymakers to boost job growth, drive economic prosperity and allow America to reclaim the mantle of infrastructure leadership on the world stage.”

U.S. Rep. Donald Norcross, D-N.J., an electrician by trade, joins McKinley as co-chair of the Congressional Building Trades Caucus.

The Trump administration and Congress have indicated they will enact a major infrastructure bill, and CEA is working with policymakers to be sure it addresses the needs of specialty trade contractors. CEA members are lobbying for voluntary use of Project Labor Agreements, maintaining and strengthening regional prevailing wage requirements and worker misclassification enforcement.

CEA’s seven employer associations include: FCA International, International Council of Employers of Bricklayers and Allied Craftworkers, Mechanical Contractors Association of America, National Electrical Contractors Association, Sheet Metal & Air Conditioning Contractors National Association, Signatory Wall and Ceiling Contractors Alliance and The Association of Union Constructors. The group represents more than 15,000 employers and 1.4 million employees nationwide.

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