Huntington community marks its Civil War history

Herald-Dispatch photo by Anthony Davis Union and Confederate reenactors get into parade rest formation at the Guyandotte Civil War Days on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015, in Guyandotte.
Herald-Dispatch photo by Anthony Davis
Union and Confederate reenactors get into parade rest formation at the Guyandotte Civil War Days on Sunday, Nov. 1, 2015, in Guyandotte.

HUNTINGTON, W.Va. — More than 150 years ago, George Childers, a member of the 13th West Virginia infantry during the Civil War, was captured and taken to an Andersonville, Georgia, prison.

During the 14 months the prison existed, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined there. Of those, almost 13,000 died from disease, poor sanitation, malnutrition, overcrowding or exposure to the elements.

Childers, however, survived. Today, his great-great-great-granddaughter Jeanne Caldwell is able to teach others about the war her ancestors fought as the president of the Guyandotte Civil War Days, which took place this past weekend for the 26th year.

 “If he hadn’t survived,” Caldwell said Sunday, “I wouldn’t be here today.”

More than 200 reenactors gathered in Guyandotte this weekend for the annual event commemorating the Raid on Guyandotte…

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