West Virginia higher education feels impact of fewer enrolled teaching students

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is the second of a two-part story on the growing crisis in public education related to a shortage of certified teachers.

By CHARLES BOOTHE

Bluefield Daily Telegraph

Concord University, founded in 1872 as a teacher’s college, is ending several education programs on the undergraduate level because of a drop in enrollment.
(Bluefield Daily Telegraph photo by Jessica Nuzzo)

BLUEFIELD, W.Va. — As fewer and fewer high school students choose teaching as a career, the impact on higher education is being felt locally.

Concord University, founded in 1872 as a teacher’s college, is ending several education programs on the undergraduate level because of a drop in enrollment.

“All of these programs have been experiencing a decline in enrollment and graduation rates,” said CU Provost and Vice President of Academic Affairs Dr. Peter Viscusi, referring to business education, math education, general science, chemistry, biology, art and early childhood special education.

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