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Tornado touchdown confirmed in Upshur County

Photo submitted to The Inter-Mountain A home on Queens Road sustained damage from an apparent tornado Wednesday evening. Officials with the National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down briefly in an area off Tallmansville Road.
Photo submitted to The Inter-Mountain
A home on Queens Road sustained damage from an apparent tornado Wednesday evening. Officials with the National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down briefly in an area off Tallmansville Road.

QUEENS, W.Va. — A team from the National Weather Service has confirmed a tornado touched down in Queens off of Tallmansville Road in Upshur County Wednesday evening.

The National Weather Service sent out an assessment team the day after a strong storm tore through the area, Meteorologist Andrew Beavers said. The team had not reported back in as of Thursday evening, but confirmed initial reports of a tornado.

“We did have a severe thunderstorm warning out for a while. We had reports of trees down, and there were reports of property damage,” he said.

Meteorologist Dylan Cooper said the team’s data will need to be analyzed before any details on the tornado would be available.

Officials said the inclement weather began shortly after 7 p.m.

James Farrell is director of the Upshur County Office of Emergency Services. He responded to the area Thursday morning.

No injuries were reported as a result of the storm, Farrell said.

“There’s damage to approximately five dwellings. There’s damage to a farm that we saw,” he said. “Pasture fences are damaged, and many branches are down in pastures and hay fields. Easily 1,000 trees are damaged.”

Farrell said there was evidence that “something other than straight-line winds” caused the damage.

“Only the NWS can declare this a tornado. Some evidence was found supporting that conclusion,” he said.

There have been no requests for emergency housing, Farrell said. All roads are open and power is on.

Farrell said the total damage was estimated at less than $50,000.

“Unless there were other storms discovered around the state this damage is far too low for any FEMA assistance,” he said.

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